Death, Euphemisms, and Bad Words

Today’s Word Wednesday is a departure from our regularly scheduled programming. I’ve been ruminating on what certain words mean to me, so we’ll have at it.

January took a sorrowful turn when my father lost his battle with cancer. I have not spoken of his health on the blog before, except in the loosest of references. Honestly, it has been too painful, knowing as we did that his diagnosis was terminal.

And in speaking of it now, it’s difficult to say–much less write–the words “my father died.” We have so many euphemisms for describing the end of life.

Words We Use to Describe Death

One friend recently called it “transitioning,” which was a new term for me, but which makes me think of a new job (or of Caitlyn Jenner).

An aunt has always referred to her deceased as “expired.” But when I think of expired milk, if it’s not gone a little sour, maybe I could still use it up. And my husband and I joke, as stinky people do, when our deodorant has quit for the day, that we’ve “expired” in the sense that we now smell a bit sour ourselves.

Technically, “expire” also refers to an exhalation from the lungs, so using expire to describe the exhalation of the spirit from the body and the fact that an inhalation is not sure to follow may be appropriate after all. It was, ultimately, respiratory failure for my father: an expiration his last mortal act.

Then there is “lost,” as in “I lost my father.”

I didn’t lose him in the sense that I don’t know where he is. I know exactly where he is, saw for myself the funeral home, the cremation oven, the ashes, and the flowing water where we poured them.

Because despite the many definitions of “lost,” the first one that registers for me is always being unable to find one’s way.

Sure, there are other definitions: something irrecoverable, as he is now, or in which a defeat has been sustained, as he did with cancer.

And now, more than usual, I find myself struggling to find my own way, not fully knowing where I am as tears threaten the surface at the slightest provocation and at the most inopportune and unexpected of moments.

So “lost” doesn’t seem appropriate to describe my father so much as it describes me.

The word “loss,” however, carries with it the sense of something now absent and greatly missed despite its rather redundant and unhelpful definition. Yet “I experienced the loss of my father” is rather a mouthful though it is quite accurate.

Moving Forward

And as for my resolutions for 2017, the verb for “resolution” is “resolve.” I resolved to do certain things in 2017. We make resolutions usually with an aim toward achievement or self-betterment. At this particular time, self-betterment dictates that I treat myself kindly. The time for aggressive writing achievement is not now.

Writing has always provided a solace for me, and making it a burdensome chore or stressor at a time when I need comfort more than ever will backfire. I do not ever want to publish a work that I’m not proud to sign my name to, so if that means my writing needs to take a backseat to my emotional health, so be it. I am still writing, and I am still going to meet my goals.

Final Thoughts

Many people think of four-letter words as the worst ones they know. Well, the vilest word I know is “cancer.” It’s an evil disease. I’ve watched it destroy a strong man and take a  terrible toll on his caregivers, primarily my mother.

Toward the end, certainly, and even before that, what cancer did to my father was no way for a person to live. It was no way for my mother to live either, constantly in fear and worry about what the next hour might bring. His suffering is at an end, but the rest of us still have to come to terms.

Please, please schedule your preventive care visits for 2017 now, when you have time for the things that get in the way, to reschedule them so that you fit them in this year. Prevention, especially with cancer, is so much more reliable than the cure.

Short but frequent doctor’s visits can allow you to avoid the nightmare of chemotherapy, the pain of physical therapy, and the horror that is cancer.

In memory of my father, I beg of you to do it for yourself.

2017 Writing Resolutions

Keeping myself accountable for my personal writing goals is a resolution I make each year. It helps me put together a plan and then attempt to meet my personal expectations.

This year I’m trying something different: I’m putting these resolutions on the blog so that the Internet becomes my accountability buddy. I’ll also check in throughout the year to see if I hit the goals I set.

And, according to all the recommendations for sticking to resolutions, I’m making them small enough to achieve, measurable, and targeted to specific dates.

Here is my writing plan for 2017:

    1. Blog 2X/month + a regular Writing Resolutions Review
    2. Send out a monthly newsletter
    3. Increase activity on FB, Twitter, and IG by posting something weekly on each platform
    4. The Demon’s Daughter (final draft submitted 12/29/2016)

      1. Determine publication status (2/10/2017 response awaited)

        1. Reach out to author FB groups for how to do newsletter giveaways (cover design, how to share, whether to post to Amazon, etc.)
      2. Market publication
    5. Sea Deception

      1. Beta reader feedback for Sea Deception 1: Sea Dreams – submitted and awaiting responses
      2. Finish Sea Deception 2: Sea Rivals by 1/31 (max 10,000 words left to write = 500 words/day)
      3. Submit Sea Deception 2: Sea Rivals to beta readers for feedback
      4. Contact chosen vendor for cover
      5. Sea Deception 3: Sea Treasures(?) Finish plotting out and write 500 words/day to finish by 3/31
      6. Cover design for Sea Deception 3: Sea Treasures
      7. Series release March 1, April 1, June 1 with pre-orders
    6. Free Worvanz

      1. Resume progress on Free Worvanz 2: WR on April 1 at 2000 words/week or 500 words/day to finish draft 1 by 6/30
      2. New covers for both books – need to find a vendor

Of course I have a number of personal resolutions too, ranging from fitness to new skill development to networking.

What resolutions have you set for 2017, and what steps are you taking to make sure that your resolutions don’t become regrets by February?